Posted in भारतीय मंदिर - Bharatiya Mandir

Dhvaja


Hinduism (The forgotten facts) added 2 new photos.


Dhvaja

Dhvaja in the Brahmanic cults takes on the appearance of a high column (dhvaja-stambha) erected in front of temples.

Dhvaja, meaning a flag banner, Dhvaja Stambha, or Flag Staff, is an important feature of most South Indian Temples. In North Indian Temples, flags are hoisted from a section of the main temple and rarely do we see a separate flag pole or Dhwaja Stambha. The flag staff is located in front of the Sanctum. There is no major symbolism attributed to the flag staff in a temple (flag of a temple do have symbolism attached to it). A Dhvaja Stamba usually represents the prosperity and pride of a temple. But some texts do suggest that the bottom of a flag post symbolizes Shiva, middle portion Brahma and the top portion Vishnu.

Today, Dvaja Stambhas are a permanent feature in many south Indian temples and are gold or silver plated or covered with copper or brass. The top portion of the flag staff in some temples in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu has three horizontal perches or three branches pointing towards the Sanctum. It symbolizes righteousness, reputation and propriety or the Trimurtis – Vishnu, Brahma and Shiva. Usually, a Bali Pitha is located near to the Dvaja Stamba and the Sanctum.

There is a widespread belief that the Dvaja Stambha gives an idea to a devotee from a long distance about the deity installed in the temple and about the Vahana or Vehicle used by the deity. It also announces about a festival in a temple. Flags are usually hoisted when there is an auspicious ceremony or festival in the temple.

Posted in भारतीय मंदिर - Bharatiya Mandir

Raja Ram temple in Orchha


Hinduism (The forgotten facts) added 2 new photos.


Raja Ram temple in Orchha

King Madhukar Shah was a devotee of Krishna, his wife was an ardent devotee of Rama. The clash in devotion and deities apparently created a rift between the couple, when the king demanded that the queen return from her pilgrimage to Ayodhya with her deity in tow, but in the form of a boy. Faced with a choice of never being able to return to Orchha again, the queen fervently prayed to her God.

Her prayers pleased Ram. He agreed to come back to Orchha with her in the form of a boy, but on a condition – he will not move from one temple to another; but will stay where she initially houses him. The sight of Ram as a child pleased the king that he agreed to build a temple for him, while the deity was worshipped by the queen in her palace. When the temple was eventually ready, the deity refused to move but remained in the queen’s palace which eventually became the Ram Raja temple. Ram is worshipped not just as a God, but as a king as well and his temple resembles a palace. And the temple built by the king is the adjoining Chaturbhuj temple which towers around the monument.

The temple is an interesting fusion of modern architecture in an ancient palace with shrines scattered around. They simply do not blend although religion and heritage meet right in the heart of the town. All the other monuments in Orchha crowd around the Ram Raja temple. The courtyard is now an open bazaar selling anything from sweets to knick knacks. The cows stand stubbornly in your path, accustomed to being worshipped and fed. The tiled flooring inside have become shelters for devotees who prepare to sleep.